Correspondence  |   November 2018
Surrogates or Outcomes: What Should We Measure?
Author Notes
  • Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. mark.kendall@lifespan.org
  • (Accepted for publication July 30, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication July 30, 2018.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   November 2018
Surrogates or Outcomes: What Should We Measure?
Anesthesiology 11 2018, Vol.129, 1048. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002418
Anesthesiology 11 2018, Vol.129, 1048. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002418
I read with great interest the article by Girsberger and colleagues in a recent issue of Anesthesiology.1  The authors investigated 36 patients and concluded that postvoid residuals were significantly lower using ropivacaine compared with bupivacaine for thoracic epidural analgesia reflecting less impairment of detrusor function with ropivacaine. The authors should be congratulated for performing a well-designed randomized trial on an important topic in perioperative medicine. One may argue that by using ropivacaine for thoracic epidurals, the risk of urinary tract infection may be reduced with important consequences for patients and healthcare systems.2,3