Newly Published
SPECIAL ARTICLE  |   September 2018
Quality Anesthesia: Medicine Measures, Patients Decide
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • Submitted for publication February 5, 2018. Accepted for publication July 2, 2018.
    Submitted for publication February 5, 2018. Accepted for publication July 2, 2018.×
  • This work was presented as the 2017 Rovenstine Lecture at the American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting, October 23, 2017, Boston, Massachusetts.
    This work was presented as the 2017 Rovenstine Lecture at the American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting, October 23, 2017, Boston, Massachusetts.×
  • Research Support: Support for this study was provided solely from institutional and/or departmental sources.
    Research Support: Support for this study was provided solely from institutional and/or departmental sources.×
  • Competing Interests: The authors declare no competing interests.
    Competing Interests: The authors declare no competing interests.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Fleisher: University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Dulles 680, Philadelphia, PA 19104. lee.fleisher@uphs.upenn.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Ethics / Medicolegal Issues / Pain Medicine / Practice Management / Quality Improvement / Opioid
SPECIAL ARTICLE   |   September 2018
Quality Anesthesia: Medicine Measures, Patients Decide
Anesthesiology Newly Published on September 26, 2018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002455
Anesthesiology Newly Published on September 26, 2018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002455
Abstract

Quality has been defined by six domains: effective, equitable, timely, efficient, safe, and patient centered. Quality of anesthesia care can be improved through measurement, either through local measures in quality improvement or through national measures in value-based purchasing programs. Death directly related to anesthesia care has been reduced, but must be measured beyond simple mortality. To improve perioperative care for our patients, we must take shared accountability for all surgical outcomes including complications, which has traditionally been viewed as being surgically related. Anesthesiologists can also impact public health by being engaged in improving cognitive recovery after surgery and addressing the opiate crisis. Going forward, we must focus on what patients want and deserve: improved patient-oriented outcomes and satisfaction with our care. By listening to our patients and being engaged in the entire perioperative process, we can make the greatest impact on perioperative care.