Newly Published
Classic Papers Revisited  |   September 2018
Succinylcholine and Intracranial Pressure
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Downstate Medical Center, State University of New York, Brooklyn, New York.
  • Submitted for publication April 12, 2018. Accepted for publication August 8, 2018.
    Submitted for publication April 12, 2018. Accepted for publication August 8, 2018.×
  • Competing Interests: The author declares no competing interests.
    Competing Interests: The author declares no competing interests.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Cottrell: State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology – Box 6, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11203. James.Cottrell@downstate.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Classic Papers Revisited / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems / Neuromuscular Diseases and Drugs / Neurosurgical Anesthesia
Classic Papers Revisited   |   September 2018
Succinylcholine and Intracranial Pressure
Anesthesiology Newly Published on September 14, 2018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002429
Anesthesiology Newly Published on September 14, 2018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002429
Abstract

Intracranial and Hemodynamic Changes after Succinylcholine Administration in Cats. By Cottrell JE, Hartung J, Giffin JP, and Shwiry B. Anesthesia & Analgesia 1983; 62:1006–9. Reprinted with permission.

Bolus injections of succinylcholine (1.5 mg/kg) significantly increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in cats under normal conditions from control levels of 8 +/- 1 mmHg to 16 +/- 3 mmHg (+/- SEM, P less than 0.01), and in the presence of artificially increased ICP from control levels of 27 +/- 1 mmHg to 47 +/- 4 mmHg (P less than 0.01). These approximately 100% increases in ICP were accompanied by a transitory decrease in mean arterial pressure (approximately 10 s), followed by a 15 to 20% increase (P less than 0.05). Pulmonary arterial pressure increased 20 to 30% (P less than 0.05). These results, when considered in conjunction with results previously obtained in humans, suggest that succinylcholine may be contraindicated in neurosurgical patients.