Editorial Views  |   October 2018
Maintenance of Certification: Has MOC Gone Amok?
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.
  • Corresponding article on page 812.
    Corresponding article on page 812.×
  • Accepted for publication June 12, 2018.
    Accepted for publication June 12, 2018.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Butterworth: john.butterworth@vcuhealth.org
Article Information
Editorial Views / Education / CPD / Pediatric Anesthesia / Quality Improvement
Editorial Views   |   October 2018
Maintenance of Certification: Has MOC Gone Amok?
Anesthesiology 10 2018, Vol.129, 631-633. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002387
Anesthesiology 10 2018, Vol.129, 631-633. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002387
DOES mandatory anesthesiologist education and recertification improve performance? This controversial, newsworthy, and important topic is addressed in an indirect fashion by Zhou et al. in this issue of the journal.1  We will assess the findings of Zhou et al. within the context of the history of the American Board of Anesthesiology and within the context of investigative work related to adult education.
A consensus was reached in the first half of the twentieth century that specialists should undergo examinations composed and directed by experts in their specialty. Thus, the American Board of Anesthesiology, created in 1937, became an independent certifying board in 1941.2  Throughout the twentieth century the process of certification by any of the (currently) 24 American Board of Medical Specialties Member Boards required completion of the following steps: