Correspondence  |   August 2018
In Reply
Author Notes
  • University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (F.W.A.). FAbdallah@toh.ca
  • (Accepted for publication May 1, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication May 1, 2018.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   August 2018
In Reply
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 380-381. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002278
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 380-381. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002278
We thank Dr. Musso et al. for the comments on our recently published paper.1  They correctly point out that the shoulder joint innervation is not limited to the suprascapular nerve. While we agree with this statement, it seems that the contribution of other nerves is modest as compared to the suprascapular nerve. Indeed, the suprascapular block does not provide a full sensory block; however, when it comes to postoperative analgesia, the differences we observed between suprascapular and interscalene blocks were not clinically important. This suggests that the use of multimodal analgesia is sufficient to mitigate any difference in analgesic efficacy between the two blocks.
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