Correspondence  |   August 2018
In Reply
Author Notes
  • University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona (A.M.P.). apatwardhan@anesth.arizona.edu
  • (Accepted for publication May 8, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication May 8, 2018.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   August 2018
In Reply
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 378-379. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002294
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 378-379. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002294
We thank Wu et al. for their thoughtful comments on our article, in which we proposed the novel concept of intraoperative use of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonists as a pharmacologic therapy for anesthesia-induced hypothermia.1  Wu et al. point out that as transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 may play a critical role in ischemia-reperfusion injury, perioperative blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 might have deleterious consequences. We believe this may not be a significant concern regarding our proposed use of intraoperative transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonists for several reasons.
First, we are proposing the possibility of the use of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonists to “prevent” anesthesia-induced hypothermia to ensure normothermia, not to cause hyperthermia. Our data in preclinical models support this outcome. We realize that there are specific surgical cases where hypothermia may be beneficial (e.g., cardiac arrest). In these circumstances, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonists would simply be avoided as maintaining normothermia is not the desired medical outcome.