Correspondence  |   August 2018
Risks of Impaired Organ Protection with Inhibiting Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1
Author Notes
  • Stanford University, Stanford, California, and the First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China (J.Q.). qianjinqiao@126.com
  • (Accepted for publication May 8, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication May 8, 2018.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   August 2018
Risks of Impaired Organ Protection with Inhibiting Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 377-378. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002293
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 377-378. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002293
With great interest we recently read the manuscript by Garami et al.,1  which illustrates how the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonists, AMG 517 and ABT-102, prevent anesthesia-induced hypothermia and simultaneously decrease opioid requirements for postoperative hyperalgesia in rodents. These preclinical data suggest that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonists may be useful as opioid-sparing modalities for analgesia intraoperatively and postoperatively while also providing hyperthermia to pharmacologically counteract anesthetic-induced hypothermia. This finding is novel and may lead the way to developing new opioid-sparing drugs to be used perioperatively. However, it would be of benefit if the authors may comment on some of the potential shortcomings we see of using transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonists during surgery and the potential strategies to overcome these barriers we outline below.