Correspondence  |   August 2018
Retained Central Venous Guidewires: Are We Flushing Them Out?
Author Notes
  • Kent and Canterbury Hospital, Canterbury, United Kingdom (R.K.). ritoo.kapoor@nhs.net
  • (Accepted for publication May 14, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication May 14, 2018.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   August 2018
Retained Central Venous Guidewires: Are We Flushing Them Out?
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 371-372. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002309
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 371-372. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002309
We read with interest the article by Mariyaselvam et al. highlighting a unique human factors approach to retained guidewires with their WireSafe kit. While the reported incidence of retained guidewires appears to be on the rise, it is currently running at approximately 0.03%.1,2  The Seldinger technique is the worldwide standard for insertion, but has the potential to result in guidewire retention. Adherence to checklists and training have been mainstays in the prevention of this complication. While checklists ensure awareness that a guidewire has been retained, they do not prevent the incident from occurring. The new WireSafe kit, with procedure completion parts in a locked box that use the guidewire as its “key,” is a novel idea and forces the operator to remove the guidewire to secure the line. However, it does not actually prevent the guidewire from being retained.