Editorial Views  |   August 2018
Dying as a Pathway to Death in Sepsis
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Surgery and Emory Critical Care Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (W.Z., C.M.C.); and the Department of Intensive Care, People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China (W.Z.).
  • Corresponding article on page 311.
    Corresponding article on page 311.×
  • Accepted for publication April 10, 2018.
    Accepted for publication April 10, 2018.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Coopersmith: cmcoop3@emory.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Critical Care / Infectious Disease
Editorial Views   |   August 2018
Dying as a Pathway to Death in Sepsis
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 238-240. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002271
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 238-240. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002271
Mortality from sepsis remains high, with at least 270,000 deaths annually in the United States and more than 5 million deaths worldwide.1,2  Despite increasing understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis, outside of targeted antibiotic therapy and source control (when appropriate), treatment is generally supportive.3  As such, improved understanding of mechanisms that lead to mortality as well as development of new therapeutics are of paramount importance to treat sepsis and septic shock, which have mortality rates of 20 to 40%. In this light, a study by Song et al. in this issue of Anesthesiology examining macrophage pyroptosis in sepsis from intraperitoneal infection of Escherichia coli, identifying a new pathway of mortality from sepsis, has potential therapeutic implications.4 
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