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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   June 2018
Streams of Unconsciousness III: Analgesia Reflected in the Acheron…or by Charon?
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   June 2018
Streams of Unconsciousness III: Analgesia Reflected in the Acheron…or by Charon?
Anesthesiology 6 2018, Vol.128, 1219. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002246
Anesthesiology 6 2018, Vol.128, 1219. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002246
As depicted in Dante’s Divine Comedy by French illustrator Gustave Doré (1832 to 1883), “Charon, the Ferryman of Hell” steered (above) the newly dead across the Underworld’s River of Woe or Pain or, yes, the River of Aches—the Acheron. To pay Charon to ferry them across, the properly buried dead supplied the oarsman with coins that had been placed under their lifeless tongues. According to Greco-Roman mythology, the plutonic rivers Lethe and Styx supplied amnesia and hypnosis, respectively—properties later prized as hallmarks of general anesthesia. Another such property, analgesia, or the relief of pain, might arguably be better reflected by ferryman Charon than by the River Acheron itself. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
As depicted in Dante’s Divine Comedy by French illustrator Gustave Doré (1832 to 1883), “Charon, the Ferryman of Hell” steered (above) the newly dead across the Underworld’s River of Woe or Pain or, yes, the River of Aches—the Acheron. To pay Charon to ferry them across, the properly buried dead supplied the oarsman with coins that had been placed under their lifeless tongues. According to Greco-Roman mythology, the plutonic rivers Lethe and Styx supplied amnesia and hypnosis, respectively—properties later prized as hallmarks of general anesthesia. Another such property, analgesia, or the relief of pain, might arguably be better reflected by ferryman Charon than by the River Acheron itself. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
As depicted in Dante’s Divine Comedy by French illustrator Gustave Doré (1832 to 1883), “Charon, the Ferryman of Hell” steered (above) the newly dead across the Underworld’s River of Woe or Pain or, yes, the River of Aches—the Acheron. To pay Charon to ferry them across, the properly buried dead supplied the oarsman with coins that had been placed under their lifeless tongues. According to Greco-Roman mythology, the plutonic rivers Lethe and Styx supplied amnesia and hypnosis, respectively—properties later prized as hallmarks of general anesthesia. Another such property, analgesia, or the relief of pain, might arguably be better reflected by ferryman Charon than by the River Acheron itself. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
As depicted in Dante’s Divine Comedy by French illustrator Gustave Doré (1832 to 1883), “Charon, the Ferryman of Hell” steered (above) the newly dead across the Underworld’s River of Woe or Pain or, yes, the River of Aches—the Acheron. To pay Charon to ferry them across, the properly buried dead supplied the oarsman with coins that had been placed under their lifeless tongues. According to Greco-Roman mythology, the plutonic rivers Lethe and Styx supplied amnesia and hypnosis, respectively—properties later prized as hallmarks of general anesthesia. Another such property, analgesia, or the relief of pain, might arguably be better reflected by ferryman Charon than by the River Acheron itself. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
As depicted in Dante’s Divine Comedy by French illustrator Gustave Doré (1832 to 1883), “Charon, the Ferryman of Hell” steered (above) the newly dead across the Underworld’s River of Woe or Pain or, yes, the River of Aches—the Acheron. To pay Charon to ferry them across, the properly buried dead supplied the oarsman with coins that had been placed under their lifeless tongues. According to Greco-Roman mythology, the plutonic rivers Lethe and Styx supplied amnesia and hypnosis, respectively—properties later prized as hallmarks of general anesthesia. Another such property, analgesia, or the relief of pain, might arguably be better reflected by ferryman Charon than by the River Acheron itself. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
As depicted in Dante’s Divine Comedy by French illustrator Gustave Doré (1832 to 1883), “Charon, the Ferryman of Hell” steered (above) the newly dead across the Underworld’s River of Woe or Pain or, yes, the River of Aches—the Acheron. To pay Charon to ferry them across, the properly buried dead supplied the oarsman with coins that had been placed under their lifeless tongues. According to Greco-Roman mythology, the plutonic rivers Lethe and Styx supplied amnesia and hypnosis, respectively—properties later prized as hallmarks of general anesthesia. Another such property, analgesia, or the relief of pain, might arguably be better reflected by ferryman Charon than by the River Acheron itself. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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