Correspondence  |   May 2018
Pump and Dump; Anesthesiologists Lead the Feed
Author Notes
  • Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. dodd.sarah@mayo.edu
  • (Accepted for publication January 29, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication January 29, 2018.)×
  • This letter was sent to the author of the original article referenced above, who agrees with this letter.—Evan D. Kharasch, M.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief.
    This letter was sent to the author of the original article referenced above, who agrees with this letter.—Evan D. Kharasch, M.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief.×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   May 2018
Pump and Dump; Anesthesiologists Lead the Feed
Anesthesiology 5 2018, Vol.128, 1046-1047. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002144
Anesthesiology 5 2018, Vol.128, 1046-1047. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002144
We would like to commend the editors of the October 2017 issue for emphasizing the topic of perioperative lactation for patients having surgery. We especially appreciate the infographic by Wanderer and Rathmell,1  titled “Anesthesia & Breastfeeding: More Often Than Not, They Are Compatible.” Wanderer and Rathmell’s work represents a paradigm shift in the way breastfeeding patients are managed and invites anesthesiologists to continue to support the maternal–infant dyad after delivery.
We are writing to voice our concern that many of our specialty’s foundational textbooks contain timeworn recommendations including “the mother should discard milk produced within the first 24 h after anesthesia.”2  Of perhaps equal concern is that many principal anesthesia textbooks omit the subject completely, further perpetuating anecdotal and potentially disruptive practices.
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