Correspondence  |   May 2018
Assessing Glucose Meter Accuracy: The Details Matter!
Author Notes
  • Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (Y.L.). yafen.liang@vanderbilt.edu
  • (Accepted for publication January 31, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication January 31, 2018.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   May 2018
Assessing Glucose Meter Accuracy: The Details Matter!
Anesthesiology 5 2018, Vol.128, 1044-1045. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002149
Anesthesiology 5 2018, Vol.128, 1044-1045. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002149
We read with great interest the recent article by Dr. Karon et al. titled “Accuracy of Capillary and Arterial Whole Blood Glucose Measurements Using a Glucose Meter in Patients under General Anesthesia in the Operating Room.”1  We congratulate the authors on identifying a glucose meter potentially safe for insulin dosing in the perioperative environment using both capillary and arterial samples, given that no glucose meter is currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use with capillary (fingerstick) samples in critically ill patients.2  Using this meter may offer an important step toward improved blood glucose control in these patients. The authors attributed the improved accuracy of glucose measurement, at least partially, to the fact that the newer generation glucose meters can “correct for hematocrit or other interferences.” We have three comments.
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