Editorial Views  |   June 2018
A Second Look at the Second Gas Effect
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anaesthesia, Christchurch Hospital and University of Otago: Christchurch, Christchurch, Aotearoa-New Zealand.
  • Corresponding article on page 1075.
    Corresponding article on page 1075.×
  • Accepted for publication February 27, 2018.
    Accepted for publication February 27, 2018.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Kennedy: Ross.kennedy@cdhb.health.nz
Article Information
Editorial Views / Pharmacology / Respiratory System
Editorial Views   |   June 2018
A Second Look at the Second Gas Effect
Anesthesiology 6 2018, Vol.128, 1053-1054. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002206
Anesthesiology 6 2018, Vol.128, 1053-1054. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002206
The Newtonian laws of physics explain the behavior of objects in the everyday physical world, such as an apple falling from a tree. For hundreds of years Newton provided a complete answer until the work of Einstein introduced the concept of relativity. The discovery of relativity did not suddenly prove Newton wrong, relativistic corrections are only required at speeds above about 67 million mph. Instead, improving technology allowed both more detailed observations and techniques for analysis that then required explanation. While most of the consequences of a Newtonian model are intuitive, much of relativity is not and is only approachable though complex equations, modeling, and highly simplified examples.