Education  |   September 2018
Electrical Impedance Tomography for Confirmation of Lung Isolation during One-lung Ventilation
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (G.H., H.Wrigge) and the Department of Pulmonary Medicine (G.S., H.Wirtz), University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
  • Charles D. Collard, M.D., served as Handling Editor for this article. G.H. and G.S. contributed equally to this article.
    Charles D. Collard, M.D., served as Handling Editor for this article. G.H. and G.S. contributed equally to this article.×
  • Corrected on April 4, 2018.
    Corrected on April 4, 2018.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Wrigge: hermann.wrigge@medizin.uni-leipzig.de
Article Information
Education / Images in Anesthesiology / Thoracic Anesthesia
Education   |   September 2018
Electrical Impedance Tomography for Confirmation of Lung Isolation during One-lung Ventilation
Anesthesiology 9 2018, Vol.129, 580. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002189
Anesthesiology 9 2018, Vol.129, 580. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002189
One-lung ventilation is regularly performed to facilitate thoracic surgical procedures during general anesthesia. The adequacy of one-lung ventilation following placement of a double-lumen endotracheal tube was verified by auscultation and intermittent fiberoptic bronchoscopy. In addition, we continuously monitored one-lung ventilation by electrical impedance tomography,1  which is a noninvasive, radiation-free bedside method that continuously displays regional distribution of ventilation and may help to optimize ventilation during general anesthesia.2  Electrical impedance tomography measurements require a belt with electrodes around the patient’s chest (top image). In brief, axial images are reconstructed from impedance changes induced by very small alternating electrical currents, that are applied through pairs of electrodes.