Editorial Views  |   May 2018
The Heat Is On: Clinical Implications of Intraoperative Thermoregulation Research
Author Notes
  • From the Centre for Integrated Critical Care and the Melbourne Clinical and Translational Sciences (MCATS), University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
  • Corresponding article on page 903.
    Corresponding article on page 903.×
  • Accepted for publication January 31, 2018.
    Accepted for publication January 31, 2018.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Story: dastory@unimelb.edu.au
Article Information
Editorial Views / Infectious Disease / Patient Safety / Quality Improvement
Editorial Views   |   May 2018
The Heat Is On: Clinical Implications of Intraoperative Thermoregulation Research
Anesthesiology 5 2018, Vol.128, 871-872. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002154
Anesthesiology 5 2018, Vol.128, 871-872. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002154
“WILL somebody turn the temperature down!!!”
Every anesthesiologist has heard this request from surgical colleagues as we endeavor to give patients the likely clinical benefits1–3  of active perioperative thermal management. While superficially these surgical demands appear to be only about the surgeon’s personal comfort, the literature raises further points about the potential risks of warmer operating rooms, including decreased quality of surgical performance and sweat contaminating the surgical site.4  The other principal warming strategy used in combination with, or as an alternative to, a warmer operating room is active warming; with forced-air warmers being the dominant current technology.1  Surgical and infection control colleagues have, however, raised concerns that forced-air warmers may change operating room airflow patterns, which may in turn increase the risk of surgical site infection.5  An important part of constructive engagement on the benefits and risks of thermal management is to better quantitively understand thermal interactions between warming modalities.
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