Correspondence  |   March 2018
Neurocritical Care Needs Predictive Scores That Succeed at Predicting Failure as Well as They Predict Success
Author Notes
  • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (J.P.). jpatlak@bidmc.harvard.edu
  • (Accepted for publication December 7, 2017.)
    (Accepted for publication December 7, 2017.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   March 2018
Neurocritical Care Needs Predictive Scores That Succeed at Predicting Failure as Well as They Predict Success
Anesthesiology 3 2018, Vol.128, 686-687. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002071
Anesthesiology 3 2018, Vol.128, 686-687. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002071
In the August 2017 issue of Anesthesiology, Asehnoune et al. report their derivation of a novel bedside scoring system to predict extubation success in the intubated brain-injured patient.1  Many brain-injured patients are likely exposed to excess ventilated days because they do not meet extubation criteria originally established in general intensive care unit (ICU) populations.2  Careful consideration is required, however, before routinely utilizing new extubation prognostication scores. Although the VISAGE (visual pursuit, swallowing, age, Glasgow coma scale for extubation) score performs well at predicting extubation success based on favorable neurologic indicators, it does not adequately predict which patients will fail extubation due to neurologic dysfunction.
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