Correspondence  |   March 2018
Does the Brachial Artery Lack Effective Collaterals?
Author Notes
  • University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (T.A.B.). bowdle@u.washington.edu
  • (Accepted for publication November 13, 2017.)
    (Accepted for publication November 13, 2017.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   March 2018
Does the Brachial Artery Lack Effective Collaterals?
Anesthesiology 3 2018, Vol.128, 674-675. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002029
Anesthesiology 3 2018, Vol.128, 674-675. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002029
We read with interest the recent article by Singh et al.1  We place many brachial artery catheters in our practice and find them useful.
It would be interesting to know whether ultrasound guidance was used for some or all of the brachial artery arterial catheterizations reported by Singh et al.1  Ultrasound guidance has been shown to reduce the complications from femoral artery access performed for cardiology and vascular surgery interventions.2,3  The same might be true for brachial catheterization.
It would also be interesting to know what infection-prevention measures were taken by Singh et al.1  in the context of the infection rate (0.04%) they report. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that the infection-prevention measures taken for arterial catheterization should be similar to those for central venous catheters,4  although anecdotally it appears that in many anesthesia practice settings, arterial catheterization is performed without all of the recommended precautions.
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