Education  |   June 2018
Tracheal A-frame Deformity: A Challenging Variant of Tracheal Stenosis
Author Notes
  • From the Cardiothoracic Section, Department of Anesthesiology (R.J.F.), and the Department of Otolaryngology (L.L.M.), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
  • Charles D. Collard, M.D., served as Handling Editor for this article.
    Charles D. Collard, M.D., served as Handling Editor for this article.×
  • The work presented in this article has been presented at the American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, on October 21, 2017.
    The work presented in this article has been presented at the American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, on October 21, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Fernando: rfernan@wakehealth.edu
Article Information
Education / Images in Anesthesiology / Respiratory System
Education   |   June 2018
Tracheal A-frame Deformity: A Challenging Variant of Tracheal Stenosis
Anesthesiology 6 2018, Vol.128, 1240. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002109
Anesthesiology 6 2018, Vol.128, 1240. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002109
TRACHEAL stenosis after tracheostomy has a reported incidence of 6 to 21% and most commonly occurs secondary to granulation tissue around the stoma or cuff site or circumferential scarring ensuing due to pressure necrosis.1,2  Alternatively, a variant known as a tracheal “A-frame” deformity (see image) can develop, which results from loss of anterior support from tracheal rings.3  Consequently, there is inward collapse of the lateral tracheal walls, which gives the trachea the characteristic “A” shape at the previous stoma site.
These patients can be difficult to intubate. Preoperatively, concerning symptoms include dyspnea on exertion, cough, and inability to clear secretions. Stridor indicates significant stenosis and necessitates emergent intervention.3  History and physical exam alone cannot differentiate between tracheal stenosis variants. Bronchoscopy or imaging such as computed tomography is necessary for specific diagnosis. Unlike typical circumferential subglottic stenosis, tracheal balloon dilations are of limited utility. Tracheal resection represents definitive management.3  Given these treatment options, strategies such as awakening asymptomatic patients1  or case cancellation with referral for treatment may not result in further optimization of airway anatomy.