Newly Published
Perioperative Medicine  |   January 2018
Sevoflurane Blocks the Induction of Long-term Potentiation When Present during, but Not When Present Only before, the High-frequency Stimulation
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology (J.L., D.L., J.E.C., I.S.K.), Department of Physiology and Pharmacology (L.Y., D.L., I.S.K.), and Robert F. Furchgott Center for Neural and Behavioral Science (I.S.K.), State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York.
  • Submitted for publication April 26, 2017. Accepted for publication November 28, 2017.
    Submitted for publication April 26, 2017. Accepted for publication November 28, 2017.×
  • Research Support: The Department of Anesthesiology, State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, received funds for this research through Brooklyn Anesthesia Research, University Physicians of Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York. Drs. Cottrell and Lin are supported by the Garry S. and Sarah Sklar Professorship in Anesthesiology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center.
    Research Support: The Department of Anesthesiology, State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, received funds for this research through Brooklyn Anesthesia Research, University Physicians of Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York. Drs. Cottrell and Lin are supported by the Garry S. and Sarah Sklar Professorship in Anesthesiology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center.×
  • Competing Interests: The authors declare no competing interests.
    Competing Interests: The authors declare no competing interests.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Kass: Department of Anesthesiology HSC 6, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11203–2098. ira.kass@downstate.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Perioperative Medicine / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems / Pharmacology
Perioperative Medicine   |   January 2018
Sevoflurane Blocks the Induction of Long-term Potentiation When Present during, but Not When Present Only before, the High-frequency Stimulation
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 11, 2018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002057
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 11, 2018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002057
Abstract

Background: This study tests the hypothesis that sevoflurane blocks long-term potentiation only if it is present during the high-frequency stimulation that induces long-term potentiation.

Methods: Long-term potentiation, an electrophysiologic correlate of memory, was induced by high-frequency stimulation and measured as a persistent increase in the field excitatory postsynaptic potential slope in the CA1 region.

Results: Long-term potentiation was induced in the no sevoflurane group (171 ± 58% vs. 96 ± 11%; n = 13, mean ± SD); when sevoflurane (4%) was present during the high-frequency stimulation, long-term potentiation was blocked (92 ± 22% vs. 99 ± 7%, n = 6). While sevoflurane reduced the size of the field excitatory postsynaptic potential to single test stimuli by 59 ± 17%, it did not significantly reduce the size of the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials during the 100 Hz high-frequency stimulation. If sevoflurane was removed from the artificial cerebrospinal fluid superfusing the slices 10 min before the high-frequency stimulation, then long-term potentiation was induced (185 ± 48%, n = 7); this was not different from long-term potentiation in the no sevoflurane slices (171 ± 58). Sevoflurane before, but not during, ϴ-burst stimulation, a physiologic stimulus, did not block the induction of long-term potentiation (151 ± 37% vs. 161 ± 34%, n = 7).

Conclusions: Sevoflurane blocks long-term potentiation formation if present during the high-frequency stimulation; this blockage of long-term potentiation does not persist if sevoflurane is discontinued before the high-frequency stimulation. These results may explain why short periods of insufficient sevoflurane anesthesia may lead to recall of painful or traumatic events during surgery.