Editorial Views  |   February 2018
Mitigating Microvascular Leak during Fluid Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Shock
Author Notes
  • From the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
  • Corresponding article on page 361.
    Corresponding article on page 361.×
  • Accepted for publication October 19, 2017.
    Accepted for publication October 19, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Walley: Keith.Walley@hli.ubc.ca
Article Information
Editorial Views / Critical Care / Renal and Urinary Systems / Electrolyte Balance
Editorial Views   |   February 2018
Mitigating Microvascular Leak during Fluid Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Shock
Anesthesiology 2 2018, Vol.128, 252-253. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002008
Anesthesiology 2 2018, Vol.128, 252-253. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002008
ALTHOUGH it is obvious that some fluid resuscitation of hypovolemic shock is required to increase intravascular volume and deliver oxygen to vital organs, it is also becoming clear that excessive fluid resuscitation has adverse consequences.1  In the urgent clinical setting, determining the optimum volume of fluid resuscitation is nontrivial. Timing and clinical context are also important. Therefore, any adjunctive strategies that increase safety and decrease apparent need for large-volume fluid resuscitation would be extremely helpful. In this issue of Anesthesiology, Trieu et al.2  take some promising first steps in an animal model of hemorrhagic hypovolemic shock.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large