Correspondence  |   January 2018
Vasopressin versus Norepinephrine in Patients with Vasoplegic Shock after Cardiac Surgery: A Discussion of the Level of Evidence
Author Notes
  • Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France (A.J.). arthur.a.james@orange.fr
  • (Accepted for publication September 29, 2017.)
    (Accepted for publication September 29, 2017.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   January 2018
Vasopressin versus Norepinephrine in Patients with Vasoplegic Shock after Cardiac Surgery: A Discussion of the Level of Evidence
Anesthesiology 1 2018, Vol.128, 228. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001955
Anesthesiology 1 2018, Vol.128, 228. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001955
We read with great interest Hajjar et al.’s article1  that was published in the January 2017 issue of Anesthesiology. Norepinephrine, the most commonly recommended vasopressor agent for vasoplegic shock states, can cause unfortunate side effects; therefore, researchers strive to find a therapeutic alternative. Several small trials have already evaluated the efficacy of vasopressin in postoperative vasoplegic shock with promising results. Hajjar et al.’s choice to design a randomized, controlled trial versus a reference treatment double-blind trial is likely to produce a high level of evidence. However, there are some methodologic biases in this study that we would like to discuss.
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