Correspondence  |   January 2018
In Reply
Author Notes
  • University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (E.O.B.). emine-bayman@uiowa.edu
  • (Accepted for publication September 28, 2017.)
    (Accepted for publication September 28, 2017.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   January 2018
In Reply
Anesthesiology 1 2018, Vol.128, 225. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001944
Anesthesiology 1 2018, Vol.128, 225. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001944
We appreciate Montes et al.’s interest in our article. In their 2015 Anesthesiology article, the authors analyzed data from 2,929 patients who were candidates for inguinal hernia repair (men), hysterectomy (women), or thoracotomy (men) under general, regional, or local anesthesia with sedation. Four hundred and two patients (all male) underwent thoracotomy. 1  Approximately 4.4 months after surgery, 37.6% of the thoracotomy patients had chronic postsurgical pain. We think the size of the study—nearly 3,000 patients enrolled—is quite remarkable.
To summarize the conclusions from Montes et al., they created a multivariate model that included all three types of surgeries where the outcome of interest was the presence of chronic postsurgical pain at 4 months after surgery. According to their model, the following variables were associated with chronic postsurgical pain at 4 months after surgery: (1) surgical procedure, (2) patient age, (3) physical health (Short Form Health Survey-12), (4) mental health (Short Form Health Survey-12), (5) preoperative pain in the surgical field, and (6) preoperative pain in another area.
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