Editorial Views  |   March 2018
Artificial Intelligence for Everyone
Author Notes
  • From the Anesthesiology Department, Hospital CLINIC de Barcelona, and Neuroimmunology Research Group, Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain (P.G.); the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (P.G.); the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (S.L.S.); and the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (S.L.S.).
  • Corresponding article on page 492.
    Corresponding article on page 492.×
  • Accepted for publication October 10, 2017.
    Accepted for publication October 10, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Shafer: steven.shafer@stanford.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Pain Medicine / Pharmacology
Editorial Views   |   March 2018
Artificial Intelligence for Everyone
Anesthesiology 3 2018, Vol.128, 431-433. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001984
Anesthesiology 3 2018, Vol.128, 431-433. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001984
THIS month’s issue of Anesthesiology contains a landmark article applying machine learning to model the interaction of remifentanil and propofol on processed electroencephalogram.1  It’s a big deal.
The June 2017 issue of MIT Technology Review claims “Google stakes its future on a piece of software.”2  The software, TensorFlow, was written by Google Brain less than 2 yr ago. TensorFlow is the software behind AlphaGo, a machine learning program that plays the ancient Chinese board game Go. There are approximately 10170 Go board positions,3  vastly exceeding the measly 1082 atoms in the observable universe.4  After a few months of training, AlphaGo readily defeated human Go champions who had trained for a lifetime.
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