Newly Published
SPECIAL ARTICLE  |   November 2017
An Anesthesiologist’s Perspective on the History of Basic Airway Management: The “Progressive” Era, 1904 to 1960
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin.
  • Submitted for publication May 27, 2017. Accepted for publication September 26, 2017.
    Submitted for publication May 27, 2017. Accepted for publication September 26, 2017.×
  • Acknowledgments: The author thanks Karen Bieterman, M.L.I.S., Director and Head Librarian; Judith Robins, M.A., Museum Registrar; and James Fortsas, M.L.I.S., Librarian at the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (Schaumburg, Illinois); and Angela Saward, Collections and Research, Wellcome Collection (London, United Kingdom).
    Acknowledgments: The author thanks Karen Bieterman, M.L.I.S., Director and Head Librarian; Judith Robins, M.A., Museum Registrar; and James Fortsas, M.L.I.S., Librarian at the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (Schaumburg, Illinois); and Angela Saward, Collections and Research, Wellcome Collection (London, United Kingdom).×
  • Research Support: Supported by departmental sources and by a 2017 Paul M. Wood Fellowship at the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (Schaumburg, Illinois).
    Research Support: Supported by departmental sources and by a 2017 Paul M. Wood Fellowship at the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (Schaumburg, Illinois).×
  • Competing Interests: Dr. Matioc holds U.S. Patent 6,651,661 B2 for the ergonomic face mask, receives royalties from the Tuoren Group (Menggang, Henan, China) for the ergonomic face mask product, and also holds U.S. Patent 8,640,692 for the advanced oropharyngeal airway.
    Competing Interests: Dr. Matioc holds U.S. Patent 6,651,661 B2 for the ergonomic face mask, receives royalties from the Tuoren Group (Menggang, Henan, China) for the ergonomic face mask product, and also holds U.S. Patent 8,640,692 for the advanced oropharyngeal airway.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Matioc: From the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, 2500 Overlook Terrace, Madison, Wisconsin 53705. aamatioc@wisc.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. ANESTHESIOLOGY’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Airway Management / Respiratory System
SPECIAL ARTICLE   |   November 2017
An Anesthesiologist’s Perspective on the History of Basic Airway Management: The “Progressive” Era, 1904 to 1960
Anesthesiology Newly Published on November 9, 2017. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001975
Anesthesiology Newly Published on November 9, 2017. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001975
Abstract

This third installment of the history of basic airway management discusses the transitional—“progressive”—years of anesthesia from 1904 to 1960. During these 56 yr, airway management was provided primarily by basic techniques with or without the use of a face mask. Airway maneuvers were inherited from the artisanal era: head extension and mandibular advancement. The most common maneuver was head extension, also used in bronchoscopy and laryngoscopy. Basic airway management success was essential for traditional inhalation anesthesia (ether, chloroform) and for the use of the new anesthetic agents (cyclopropane, halothane) and intravenous drugs (thiopental, curare, succinylcholine). By the end of the era, the superiority of intermittent positive pressure ventilation to spontaneous ventilation in anesthesia and negative pressure ventilation in resuscitation had been demonstrated and accepted, and the implementation of endotracheal intubation as a routine technique was underway.