Correspondence  |   December 2017
Ideal Body Weight Is Not Really Ideal
Author Notes
  • Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (J.B.B.). jbrodsky@stanford.edu
  • (Accepted for publication August 15, 2017)
    (Accepted for publication August 15, 2017)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   December 2017
Ideal Body Weight Is Not Really Ideal
Anesthesiology 12 2017, Vol.127, 1043-1044. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001883
Anesthesiology 12 2017, Vol.127, 1043-1044. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001883
As Moreault et al.1  recently discussed in this journal, some anesthetic management guidelines as well as many drug dosing regimens2  are based on a patient’s ideal body weight (IBW). Despite being an important measure in clinical practice, there is no consensus as to what IBW really represents or how to calculate it.3  IBW has no physiologic basis and there is no single weight that is ideal for any patient of a given height.4  For both men and women, IBW often is described as a body mass index (BMI; BMI = kg/m2) between 20 and 25 kg/m2. BMI is not a measure of adiposity because it considers weight irrespective of the source, and excess amounts of fluid, muscle, and bone can each increase BMI.
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