Education  |   April 2018
Images in Anesthesiology: A Clot in Transit: Impending Paradoxical Embolization
Author Notes
  • From the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio.
  • Charles D. Collard, M.D., served as Handling Editor for this article.
    Charles D. Collard, M.D., served as Handling Editor for this article.×
  • Supplemental Digital Content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are available in both the HTML and PDF versions of this article. Links to the digital files are provided in the HTML text of this article on the Journal’s Web site (www.anesthesiology.org).
    Supplemental Digital Content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are available in both the HTML and PDF versions of this article. Links to the digital files are provided in the HTML text of this article on the Journal’s Web site (www.anesthesiology.org).×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Khanna: khannas@ccf.org
Article Information
Education / Images in Anesthesiology / Coagulation and Transfusion
Education   |   April 2018
Images in Anesthesiology: A Clot in Transit: Impending Paradoxical Embolization
Anesthesiology 4 2018, Vol.128, 810. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001938
Anesthesiology 4 2018, Vol.128, 810. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001938
PARADOXICAL embolization is rare but possible in patients with a patent foramen ovale (PFO).1,2  The accompanying images exhibit impending paradoxical embolization. A serpentine clot, involving all cardiac chambers (top) is seen extending from right to left atrium via a PFO (bottom). Such a thrombus that exhibits independent motion is designated as a “clot in transit” (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content, http://links.lww.com/ALN/B550, which demonstrates clot motion). Emergency surgical embolectomy with cardiopulmonary bypass is indicated due to risk of catastrophic systemic embolization.2,3  Perioperative anesthetic management is challenging, because hemodynamic collapse occurs frequently. Unpredictable piecemeal or large thrombus embolization increases pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) leading to acute right heart failure and decreased left ventricular filling. Anesthesia and tachyarrhythmia-induced hypotension compromise coronary perfusion, further worsening contractility and ventricular function.3  Consequently, hemodynamic collapse can ensue. Additionally, increased PVR causes right atrial pressure to exceed left atrial pressure, facilitating right-to-left shunting and clot propagation into left cardiac chambers through the PFO.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large