Special Articles  |   November 2017
Earliest English Definitions of Anaisthesia and Anaesthesia
Author Notes
  • From the Harry Daly Museum and the Richard Bailey Library, Australian Society of Anaesthetists, North Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Submitted for publication December 22, 2016. Accepted for publication April 26, 2017.
    Submitted for publication December 22, 2016. Accepted for publication April 26, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Haridas: 234 Thirteenth Street, Mildura, Victoria 3500, Australia. rajesh.haridas@bigpond.com. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Special Articles / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems / Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Systems / Infectious Disease / Ophthalmologic Anesthesia / Respiratory System
Special Articles   |   November 2017
Earliest English Definitions of Anaisthesia and Anaesthesia
Anesthesiology 11 2017, Vol.127, 747-753. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001764
Anesthesiology 11 2017, Vol.127, 747-753. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001764
Abstract

The earliest identified English definition of the word anaisthesia was discovered in the first edition (1684) of A Physical Dictionary, an English translation of Steven Blankaart’s medical dictionary, Lexicon Medicum Graeco-Latinum. This definition was almost certainly the source of the definition of anaesthesia which appeared in Dictionarium Anglo-Britannicum (1708), a general-purpose English dictionary compiled by the lexicographer John Kersey. The words anaisthesia and anaesthesia have not been identified in English medical or surgical publications that antedate the earliest English dictionaries in which they are known to have been defined.