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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   November 2017
Queen Victoria’s Youngest Two Sons: Princes Arthur and Leopold
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   November 2017
Queen Victoria’s Youngest Two Sons: Princes Arthur and Leopold
Anesthesiology 11 2017, Vol.127, 740. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001901
Anesthesiology 11 2017, Vol.127, 740. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001901
In June of 1860, English photographer John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813 to 1901) captured photo-portraits of Queen Victoria’s children. In this close-up from Mayall’s albumen carte de visite (above), 10-yr-old Prince Arthur (1850 to 1942) rests his right hand on the right shoulder of 7-yr-old Prince Leopold (1853 to 1884). Both princes are dressed in the kilts and hose of Highland garb. As the seventh of the Queen’s nine children and her third son, Prince Arthur would follow in the footsteps of the father he so closely resembled—into the military and into a host of “manly” pursuits. His birth had been anguishing enough to motivate the Queen to consent to chloroform administered by Dr. John Snow for the birth of her next child, Prince Leopold. Constrained by hemophilia and epilepsy to less physically rigorous pursuits, the Queen’s youngest son, Prince Leopold, served as the Queen’s personal secretary and championed both chess and the arts. Sadly, the intellectually brightest of Victoria’s children, Prince Leopold, fell down a staircase in France and succumbed to a cerebral hemorrhage when he was 30 yr old. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In June of 1860, English photographer John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813 to 1901) captured photo-portraits of Queen Victoria’s children. In this close-up from Mayall’s albumen carte de visite (above), 10-yr-old Prince Arthur (1850 to 1942) rests his right hand on the right shoulder of 7-yr-old Prince Leopold (1853 to 1884). Both princes are dressed in the kilts and hose of Highland garb. As the seventh of the Queen’s nine children and her third son, Prince Arthur would follow in the footsteps of the father he so closely resembled—into the military and into a host of “manly” pursuits. His birth had been anguishing enough to motivate the Queen to consent to chloroform administered by Dr. John Snow for the birth of her next child, Prince Leopold. Constrained by hemophilia and epilepsy to less physically rigorous pursuits, the Queen’s youngest son, Prince Leopold, served as the Queen’s personal secretary and championed both chess and the arts. Sadly, the intellectually brightest of Victoria’s children, Prince Leopold, fell down a staircase in France and succumbed to a cerebral hemorrhage when he was 30 yr old. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In June of 1860, English photographer John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813 to 1901) captured photo-portraits of Queen Victoria’s children. In this close-up from Mayall’s albumen carte de visite (above), 10-yr-old Prince Arthur (1850 to 1942) rests his right hand on the right shoulder of 7-yr-old Prince Leopold (1853 to 1884). Both princes are dressed in the kilts and hose of Highland garb. As the seventh of the Queen’s nine children and her third son, Prince Arthur would follow in the footsteps of the father he so closely resembled—into the military and into a host of “manly” pursuits. His birth had been anguishing enough to motivate the Queen to consent to chloroform administered by Dr. John Snow for the birth of her next child, Prince Leopold. Constrained by hemophilia and epilepsy to less physically rigorous pursuits, the Queen’s youngest son, Prince Leopold, served as the Queen’s personal secretary and championed both chess and the arts. Sadly, the intellectually brightest of Victoria’s children, Prince Leopold, fell down a staircase in France and succumbed to a cerebral hemorrhage when he was 30 yr old. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
In June of 1860, English photographer John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813 to 1901) captured photo-portraits of Queen Victoria’s children. In this close-up from Mayall’s albumen carte de visite (above), 10-yr-old Prince Arthur (1850 to 1942) rests his right hand on the right shoulder of 7-yr-old Prince Leopold (1853 to 1884). Both princes are dressed in the kilts and hose of Highland garb. As the seventh of the Queen’s nine children and her third son, Prince Arthur would follow in the footsteps of the father he so closely resembled—into the military and into a host of “manly” pursuits. His birth had been anguishing enough to motivate the Queen to consent to chloroform administered by Dr. John Snow for the birth of her next child, Prince Leopold. Constrained by hemophilia and epilepsy to less physically rigorous pursuits, the Queen’s youngest son, Prince Leopold, served as the Queen’s personal secretary and championed both chess and the arts. Sadly, the intellectually brightest of Victoria’s children, Prince Leopold, fell down a staircase in France and succumbed to a cerebral hemorrhage when he was 30 yr old. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In June of 1860, English photographer John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813 to 1901) captured photo-portraits of Queen Victoria’s children. In this close-up from Mayall’s albumen carte de visite (above), 10-yr-old Prince Arthur (1850 to 1942) rests his right hand on the right shoulder of 7-yr-old Prince Leopold (1853 to 1884). Both princes are dressed in the kilts and hose of Highland garb. As the seventh of the Queen’s nine children and her third son, Prince Arthur would follow in the footsteps of the father he so closely resembled—into the military and into a host of “manly” pursuits. His birth had been anguishing enough to motivate the Queen to consent to chloroform administered by Dr. John Snow for the birth of her next child, Prince Leopold. Constrained by hemophilia and epilepsy to less physically rigorous pursuits, the Queen’s youngest son, Prince Leopold, served as the Queen’s personal secretary and championed both chess and the arts. Sadly, the intellectually brightest of Victoria’s children, Prince Leopold, fell down a staircase in France and succumbed to a cerebral hemorrhage when he was 30 yr old. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In June of 1860, English photographer John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813 to 1901) captured photo-portraits of Queen Victoria’s children. In this close-up from Mayall’s albumen carte de visite (above), 10-yr-old Prince Arthur (1850 to 1942) rests his right hand on the right shoulder of 7-yr-old Prince Leopold (1853 to 1884). Both princes are dressed in the kilts and hose of Highland garb. As the seventh of the Queen’s nine children and her third son, Prince Arthur would follow in the footsteps of the father he so closely resembled—into the military and into a host of “manly” pursuits. His birth had been anguishing enough to motivate the Queen to consent to chloroform administered by Dr. John Snow for the birth of her next child, Prince Leopold. Constrained by hemophilia and epilepsy to less physically rigorous pursuits, the Queen’s youngest son, Prince Leopold, served as the Queen’s personal secretary and championed both chess and the arts. Sadly, the intellectually brightest of Victoria’s children, Prince Leopold, fell down a staircase in France and succumbed to a cerebral hemorrhage when he was 30 yr old. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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