Correspondence  |   October 2017
Current Status of Neuromuscular Reversal and Monitoring: Posttetanic Neuromonitoring and Other Considerations
Author Notes
  • University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. hgrocott@sbgh.mb.ca
  • (Accepted for publication June 30, 2017.)
    (Accepted for publication June 30, 2017.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   October 2017
Current Status of Neuromuscular Reversal and Monitoring: Posttetanic Neuromonitoring and Other Considerations
Anesthesiology 10 2017, Vol.127, 723-724. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001806
Anesthesiology 10 2017, Vol.127, 723-724. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001806
The recent comprehensive review article by Drs. Brull and Kopman1  outlines the challenges and opportunities of the current status of neuromuscular reversal and monitoring. Their superlative and informative review is clearly destined to be a go-to reference on the subject. Importantly, it should serve as a rallying point for advancing future neuromuscular blockade (NMB) and function monitoring.
Several aspects of this article do warrant additional comment, however. First, the article deals with many important concepts in NMB monitoring and reversal, including not only perioperative considerations, but issues pertinent to the intensive care unit (ICU) where residual neuromuscular blockade, and associated patient awareness, has occasionally been reported.2  Given that the article will rightly take its place as a definitive article on the subject, and as an advocate for postpublication peer-review, I was curious as to why the section discussing awareness from residual paralysis in the ICU included a reference to an article on hypothermia in the ICU (that does not actually mention awareness at all).3  That minor irregularity aside, the excellent text, tables, and figures make for an easy to understand description of all the important concepts in NMB monitoring.
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