Editorial Views  |   December 2017
Xenon and Cardioprotection: Is This the Light at the End of the Tunnel?
Author Notes
  • From the Departments of Anesthesia (Y.L.M.), Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (Y.L.M., R.W.), and Surgery (R.W.), Michael DeGroote School of Medicine Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada; Population Health Research Institute, David Braley Cardiac, Vascular and Stroke Research Institute, Perioperative Medicine and Surgical Research Unit, Hamilton, Canada (Y.L.M., S.S., R.W.); and University of Bari School of Medicine and Surgery, Hospital Policlinico, Bari, Italy (S.S.).
  • Corresponding article on page 918.
    Corresponding article on page 918.×
  • Accepted for publication June 13, 2017.
    Accepted for publication June 13, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Le Manach: Yannick.Lemanach@phri.ca
Article Information
Editorial Views / Cardiovascular Anesthesia
Editorial Views   |   December 2017
Xenon and Cardioprotection: Is This the Light at the End of the Tunnel?
Anesthesiology 12 2017, Vol.127, 913-914. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001874
Anesthesiology 12 2017, Vol.127, 913-914. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001874
ALTHOUGH the anesthetic effect of xenon was discovered more than 60 yr ago,1  it is better known for automotive headlight applications than for use in the operating theatre. In this issue of Anesthesiology, Hofland et al.2  report the largest ever conducted evaluation of the cardioprotective properties of xenon in cardiac surgery patients.
The use of xenon in routine anesthesia has been limited by high price and low availability. The global production of this noble gas by a fractional distillation process of liquid air consumes an enormous amount of energy and would not cover for more than few days of the anesthesia procedures conducted worldwide every year.
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