Editorial Views  |   November 2017
Precision Correction of Coagulopathy or Prothrombin Complex Concentrates?: Reversal Options for Dabigatran following Trauma
Author Notes
  • From the Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (M.D.N.); and the Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (J.H.L.).
  • Corresponding article on page 852.
    Corresponding article on page 852.×
  • Accepted for publication July 12, 2017.
    Accepted for publication July 12, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Neal: nealm2@upmc.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Coagulation and Transfusion / Hematologic System / Trauma / Burn Care
Editorial Views   |   November 2017
Precision Correction of Coagulopathy or Prothrombin Complex Concentrates?: Reversal Options for Dabigatran following Trauma
Anesthesiology 11 2017, Vol.127, 744-746. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001857
Anesthesiology 11 2017, Vol.127, 744-746. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001857
EMERGENCY care providers need to have therapies for the acutely bleeding patient, especially for trauma patients and those requiring emergency surgery. Trauma is a leading cause of mortality worldwide with hemorrhage as the leading cause of preventable death. As many as 30% of severely injured trauma patients will present with a unique, endogenous coagulopathy referred to as trauma-induced coagulopathy. In addition to this problem, the number of trauma patients on direct-acting oral anticoagulants is growing. These drugs are increasingly used for the prevention of cerebrovascular embolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, the treatment of venous thromboembolism, and thromboprophylaxis in patients undergoing surgery.1–3 
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