Education  |   January 2018
Inadvertent Endotracheal Cuff Hyperinflation Diagnosed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesia (L.V.), Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics (S.-J.Y.), and Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (K.A.C.), Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Vorobeichik: l.vorobeichik@mail.utoronto.ca
Article Information
Education / Images in Anesthesiology / Radiological and Other Imaging / Technology / Equipment / Monitoring
Education   |   January 2018
Inadvertent Endotracheal Cuff Hyperinflation Diagnosed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Anesthesiology 1 2018, Vol.128, 141. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001836
Anesthesiology 1 2018, Vol.128, 141. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001836
ENDOTRACHEAL tube (ETT) cuff hyperinflation was incidentally diagnosed in a 5-yr-old maintained on N2O-free general anesthesia (Microcuff, 4.5 mm, inflated with 1.8 ml of air) during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging preceding catheterization. Magnetic resonance angiograms reformatted in coronal (image A) and sagittal (image B) planes of the trachea demonstrate pronounced tracheal distention (thin arrow) at the ETT cuff site, with a thinner contrast-enhanced layer of the tracheal wall (thick arrow), suggesting a degree of mucosal compression. Subsequent cuff manometer measurement demonstrated a pressure of 30 cm H2O, indicating that too high of an airway pressure was applied when testing for an air leak.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large