Education  |   December 2017
Images in Anesthesiology: Proper Positioning of an Impella 2.5 and CP Heart Pump
Author Notes
  • From the Division of Cardiovascular Anesthesia, Texas Heart Institute, Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center, Houston, Texas.
  • Alan Jay Schwartz, M.D., M.S.Ed., served as Handling Editor for this article.
    Alan Jay Schwartz, M.D., M.S.Ed., served as Handling Editor for this article.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Anderson: bbanderson.anesthesia@gmail.com
Article Information
Education / Images in Anesthesiology / Cardiovascular Anesthesia
Education   |   December 2017
Images in Anesthesiology: Proper Positioning of an Impella 2.5 and CP Heart Pump
Anesthesiology 12 2017, Vol.127, 1014. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001791
Anesthesiology 12 2017, Vol.127, 1014. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001791
THE Impella microaxial heart pump (Abiomed, USA) is approved for temporary left ventricular support to increase cardiac output and decrease myocardial oxygen demand.1–3  Inserted percutaneously through the femoral or axillary artery, the Impella catheter (fig. A) sits in the mid-left vetricular space, with its inlet area approximately 3.5 cm below the aortic annulus and its outlet area in the ascending aorta. Proper positioning of the Impella 2.5 and Impella CP can be verified by two waveforms called the placement signal (red) and motor current (green). The placement signal displays pressure (in millimeters mercury) throughout the cardiac cycle generated from an open pressure area. The motor current (in milliamps) displays the energy intake of the motor, which normally pulsates due to the pressure gradient between the ventricular inlet and the aortic outlet areas.
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