Editorial Views  |   September 2017
Simulation for Assessment of the Practice of Board-certified Anesthesiologists
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (C.A.L.); Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (M.A.W.); and Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Health Care, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (J.P.R.).
  • Corresponding article on page 475.
    Corresponding article on page 475.×
  • Accepted for publication June 20, 2017.
    Accepted for publication June 20, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Lien: clien@mcw.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Education / CPD
Editorial Views   |   September 2017
Simulation for Assessment of the Practice of Board-certified Anesthesiologists
Anesthesiology 9 2017, Vol.127, 410-412. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001792
Anesthesiology 9 2017, Vol.127, 410-412. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001792
SIMULATION in the field of anesthesiology has proven useful in helping clinicians keep their practice skills current, particularly in the management of uncommon crises that they may encounter in their day-to-day work environment. Simulation is now an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirement for residency programs, and its use as an educational tool has been well demonstrated. Recognizing its benefits to practicing anesthesiologists, simulation is an accepted component of Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology (MOCA), Part 4, which is aimed to improve medical practice.
Although the use of simulation for assessment has been described in training situations, it has not been widely discussed as an assessment tool for practicing anesthesiologists. In this issue of Anesthesiology, Weinger et al.1  assessed the performance of board-certified anesthesiologists in managing critical events that may occur in the course of the everyday practice of anesthesiology. What can we learn from this new use of high-fidelity simulation? The results of their study raise concern. Many practicing anesthesiologists were rated as performing poorly in the management of uncommon but what should be familiar scenarios: local anesthetic systemic toxicity, hemorrhagic shock from occult peritoneal bleeding, malignant hyperthermia in the postanesthesia care unit, and acute onset of atrial fibrillation with hemodynamic instability followed by ST elevation myocardial infarction.
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