Editorial Views  |   August 2017
Decision to Extubate Brain-injured Patients: Limiting Uncertainty in Neurocritical Care
Author Notes
  • From the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Clermont-Ferrand, Departement de Médecine Périopératoire, Clermont-Ferrand, France (T.G., R.C., J.-M.C.); and Université Clermont Auvergne, Laboratoire Universitaire GReD, UMR/CNRS 6293, INSERM U1103, Clermont-Ferrand, France (T.G., J.-M.C.).
  • Corresponding article appears on page 338.
    Corresponding article appears on page 338.×
  • Accepted for publication May 2, 2017.
    Accepted for publication May 2, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Godet: tgodet@chu-clermontferrand.fr
Article Information
Editorial Views / Airway Management / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems
Editorial Views   |   August 2017
Decision to Extubate Brain-injured Patients: Limiting Uncertainty in Neurocritical Care
Anesthesiology 8 2017, Vol.127, 217-219. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001726
Anesthesiology 8 2017, Vol.127, 217-219. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001726
WHATEVER the field of critical care medicine, timely decision to extubate, to both prevent complications associated with extubation failure and undue ventilatory support, remains challenging. Finding reliable clinical predictors of extubation success still appears as a holy grail.1  In this issue of Anesthesiology, Asehnoune et al. explored such predictors in the specific population of brain-injured patients.2 
In neurocritical illness, invasive mechanical ventilation is frequently clinically indicated to manage life-threatening brain injuries responsible for agitation, stupor, or coma.3  Airway protection provided by tracheal intubation prevents aspiration pneumonia and hypoxemia. Mechanical ventilation enables sedation and carbon dioxide modulation.
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