Correspondence  |   July 2017
Is Airway Management Better?
Author Notes
  • Department of Anesthesiology, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island (A.M.). amaslow@rcn.com
  • (Accepted for publication April 9, 2017.)
    (Accepted for publication April 9, 2017.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   July 2017
Is Airway Management Better?
Anesthesiology 7 2017, Vol.127, 200-201. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001690
Anesthesiology 7 2017, Vol.127, 200-201. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001690
The article by Aziz et al.1  describes difficult airway management over a 8- to 9-yr period and analyzes the use and success of different airway devices for rescue after failed direct laryngoscopy. The authors found that video laryngoscopy was used most often and had the highest rate of success as a rescue tool (92%) compared to fiberoptic bronchoscopy, lighted stylets, optical stylets, and supraglottic airways (67 to 78% success rate). They speculate that the results may “reflect . . . widespread availability of video laryngoscopy, an anticipated high success rate, and growing comfort and familiarity with this technique.” The authors state that the growing use of the video laryngoscopes, of which the Glide Scope was used 83% of the time, is a “practice improvement.” The attractiveness of video laryngoscopy is understandable as it is technically similar to direct laryngoscopy and, compared to other rescue techniques, may be easier to teach, learn, and master, perhaps fueling the increased use as highlighted in this article.
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