Correspondence  |   July 2017
Should Neuromuscular Blocking Agents Always Be Reversed?
Author Notes
  • Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (M.J.M.). matthewjmeyer@gmail.com
  • (Accepted for publication April 13, 2017.)
    (Accepted for publication April 13, 2017.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   July 2017
Should Neuromuscular Blocking Agents Always Be Reversed?
Anesthesiology 7 2017, Vol.127, 194. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001693
Anesthesiology 7 2017, Vol.127, 194. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001693
We read with great interest the Bulka et al.1  article associating intraoperative neuromuscular blockade administration with postoperative pneumonia. We found the conclusion that not “reversing” neuromuscular blockade was associated with an increased risk of postoperative pneumonia to be particularly important. However, we find the title of the accompanying editorial (“To Reverse or Not to Reverse?” The Answer Is Clear!2 ) to be misleading, and the second part of the text in the editorial’s figure (“reversal of neuromuscular blocking agents should be routine”) to differ from what we would consider safe and patient-centered practice.
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