Free
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   July 2017
William B. Quinn, M.D., Eclectic Physician and Occasional “Anaesthetist”
Article Information
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   July 2017
William B. Quinn, M.D., Eclectic Physician and Occasional “Anaesthetist”
Anesthesiology 7 2017, Vol.127, 191. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001751
Anesthesiology 7 2017, Vol.127, 191. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001751
In Springfield, Ohio, on St. Patrick’s Day of 1920, a female patient paid $15 to Clayton W. Russell, M.D. (1866 to 1922). Her receipt from the surgeon (above) allocated $5 to his surgical assistant, Howard H. Austin, M.D. (1880 to 1915). The remaining $10 was designated for “Dr. Quinn, Anaesthe[ti]st.” So who was Doctor Quinn? A Kentucky native, William Babbit Quinn, M.D. (1892 to 1970), was raised by his Eclectic-physician mother after she was widowed during William’s first week of life. Young William followed in his mother’s footsteps, graduating in 1913 from her alma mater, the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio. He trained and practiced in Springfield, Ohio, Blackwell’s Island, New York, and then Hollywood, California, before settling back in Springfield. The depicted receipt was likely issued from the surgeon’s office in the Fairbanks Building, where all three of these Eclectic alumni, Drs. Russell, Austin, and Quinn, maintained professional offices. In this time period, surgeons could charge the equivalent of 5 to 10% of their surgeon’s fee from patients to pay for services rendered by the anesthetist. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In Springfield, Ohio, on St. Patrick’s Day of 1920, a female patient paid $15 to Clayton W. Russell, M.D. (1866 to 1922). Her receipt from the surgeon (above) allocated $5 to his surgical assistant, Howard H. Austin, M.D. (1880 to 1915). The remaining $10 was designated for “Dr. Quinn, Anaesthe[ti]st.” So who was Doctor Quinn? A Kentucky native, William Babbit Quinn, M.D. (1892 to 1970), was raised by his Eclectic-physician mother after she was widowed during William’s first week of life. Young William followed in his mother’s footsteps, graduating in 1913 from her alma mater, the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio. He trained and practiced in Springfield, Ohio, Blackwell’s Island, New York, and then Hollywood, California, before settling back in Springfield. The depicted receipt was likely issued from the surgeon’s office in the Fairbanks Building, where all three of these Eclectic alumni, Drs. Russell, Austin, and Quinn, maintained professional offices. In this time period, surgeons could charge the equivalent of 5 to 10% of their surgeon’s fee from patients to pay for services rendered by the anesthetist. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In Springfield, Ohio, on St. Patrick’s Day of 1920, a female patient paid $15 to Clayton W. Russell, M.D. (1866 to 1922). Her receipt from the surgeon (above) allocated $5 to his surgical assistant, Howard H. Austin, M.D. (1880 to 1915). The remaining $10 was designated for “Dr. Quinn, Anaesthe[ti]st.” So who was Doctor Quinn? A Kentucky native, William Babbit Quinn, M.D. (1892 to 1970), was raised by his Eclectic-physician mother after she was widowed during William’s first week of life. Young William followed in his mother’s footsteps, graduating in 1913 from her alma mater, the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio. He trained and practiced in Springfield, Ohio, Blackwell’s Island, New York, and then Hollywood, California, before settling back in Springfield. The depicted receipt was likely issued from the surgeon’s office in the Fairbanks Building, where all three of these Eclectic alumni, Drs. Russell, Austin, and Quinn, maintained professional offices. In this time period, surgeons could charge the equivalent of 5 to 10% of their surgeon’s fee from patients to pay for services rendered by the anesthetist. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
×
George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
In Springfield, Ohio, on St. Patrick’s Day of 1920, a female patient paid $15 to Clayton W. Russell, M.D. (1866 to 1922). Her receipt from the surgeon (above) allocated $5 to his surgical assistant, Howard H. Austin, M.D. (1880 to 1915). The remaining $10 was designated for “Dr. Quinn, Anaesthe[ti]st.” So who was Doctor Quinn? A Kentucky native, William Babbit Quinn, M.D. (1892 to 1970), was raised by his Eclectic-physician mother after she was widowed during William’s first week of life. Young William followed in his mother’s footsteps, graduating in 1913 from her alma mater, the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio. He trained and practiced in Springfield, Ohio, Blackwell’s Island, New York, and then Hollywood, California, before settling back in Springfield. The depicted receipt was likely issued from the surgeon’s office in the Fairbanks Building, where all three of these Eclectic alumni, Drs. Russell, Austin, and Quinn, maintained professional offices. In this time period, surgeons could charge the equivalent of 5 to 10% of their surgeon’s fee from patients to pay for services rendered by the anesthetist. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In Springfield, Ohio, on St. Patrick’s Day of 1920, a female patient paid $15 to Clayton W. Russell, M.D. (1866 to 1922). Her receipt from the surgeon (above) allocated $5 to his surgical assistant, Howard H. Austin, M.D. (1880 to 1915). The remaining $10 was designated for “Dr. Quinn, Anaesthe[ti]st.” So who was Doctor Quinn? A Kentucky native, William Babbit Quinn, M.D. (1892 to 1970), was raised by his Eclectic-physician mother after she was widowed during William’s first week of life. Young William followed in his mother’s footsteps, graduating in 1913 from her alma mater, the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio. He trained and practiced in Springfield, Ohio, Blackwell’s Island, New York, and then Hollywood, California, before settling back in Springfield. The depicted receipt was likely issued from the surgeon’s office in the Fairbanks Building, where all three of these Eclectic alumni, Drs. Russell, Austin, and Quinn, maintained professional offices. In this time period, surgeons could charge the equivalent of 5 to 10% of their surgeon’s fee from patients to pay for services rendered by the anesthetist. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In Springfield, Ohio, on St. Patrick’s Day of 1920, a female patient paid $15 to Clayton W. Russell, M.D. (1866 to 1922). Her receipt from the surgeon (above) allocated $5 to his surgical assistant, Howard H. Austin, M.D. (1880 to 1915). The remaining $10 was designated for “Dr. Quinn, Anaesthe[ti]st.” So who was Doctor Quinn? A Kentucky native, William Babbit Quinn, M.D. (1892 to 1970), was raised by his Eclectic-physician mother after she was widowed during William’s first week of life. Young William followed in his mother’s footsteps, graduating in 1913 from her alma mater, the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio. He trained and practiced in Springfield, Ohio, Blackwell’s Island, New York, and then Hollywood, California, before settling back in Springfield. The depicted receipt was likely issued from the surgeon’s office in the Fairbanks Building, where all three of these Eclectic alumni, Drs. Russell, Austin, and Quinn, maintained professional offices. In this time period, surgeons could charge the equivalent of 5 to 10% of their surgeon’s fee from patients to pay for services rendered by the anesthetist. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
×