Editorial Views  |   August 2017
Can We Really Suggest that Anesthesia Might Cause Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder?
Author Notes
  • From the Department of General Medicine, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (D.E.); Melbourne Children’s Trials Centre (A.J.D.), Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (D.E.), Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (D.E.); Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology, and Intensive Care, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland (L.V.); Department of Basic Neuroscience, University of Geneva Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland (L.V.); and Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Management, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (A.J.D.).
  • Corresponding article on page 227.
    Corresponding article on page 227.×
  • Accepted for publication April 27, 2017.
    Accepted for publication April 27, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Davidson: andrew.davidson@rch.org.au
Article Information
Editorial Views / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems / Pediatric Anesthesia
Editorial Views   |   August 2017
Can We Really Suggest that Anesthesia Might Cause Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder?
Anesthesiology 8 2017, Vol.127, 209-211. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001736
Anesthesiology 8 2017, Vol.127, 209-211. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001736
THE impact of anesthesia on the developing brain continues to be hotly debated. In this issue, Hu et al.,1  from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, report an association between childhood exposure to multiple anesthetics and increased risk of learning disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study uses a well-established birth cohort and is similar to two studies published previously by the same Mayo Clinic group.2,3  The earlier studies were criticized for including children who were anesthetized in an era that relied on somewhat outdated drugs and monitoring. The study reported in this issue included children anesthetized with more contemporary agents and monitoring. The results are almost identical to the previous studies. All find an association between exposure to anesthesia in early childhood and subsequent diagnosis of learning disability and/or ADHD, and the associations were stronger with multiple exposures compared with single exposures.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large