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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   June 2017
Two Cents’ Worth from “Pain Killer” Makers Perry Davis & Son
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   June 2017
Two Cents’ Worth from “Pain Killer” Makers Perry Davis & Son
Anesthesiology 6 2017, Vol.126, 1018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001677
Anesthesiology 6 2017, Vol.126, 1018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001677
When you reach for a “painkiller,” remember to thank New England manufacturers Perry Davis (1791 to 1862) and then his son Edmund (1824 to 1880) for the older Davis’s 1839 formulation of “Vegetable Pain-Killer.” By 1854 from Providence, Rhode Island, “Perry Davis & Son” (lower left) had become so prosperous that they were issuing one-cent paper notes (upper left) and one-cent revenue stamps (upper right). An ordained minister, Rev. Davis generously donated his “Pain Killer” to religious missions in China, India, and around the globe. From these religious outposts, dedicated missionaries promoted temperance and decried the evils of alcohol and opium. And what was this Davis-donated “Joy to the World” (lower right), the “Pain Killer” that many missionaries were distributing? Why, it was a heavily alcoholic herbal elixir that was laced with opium…. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
When you reach for a “painkiller,” remember to thank New England manufacturers Perry Davis (1791 to 1862) and then his son Edmund (1824 to 1880) for the older Davis’s 1839 formulation of “Vegetable Pain-Killer.” By 1854 from Providence, Rhode Island, “Perry Davis & Son” (lower left) had become so prosperous that they were issuing one-cent paper notes (upper left) and one-cent revenue stamps (upper right). An ordained minister, Rev. Davis generously donated his “Pain Killer” to religious missions in China, India, and around the globe. From these religious outposts, dedicated missionaries promoted temperance and decried the evils of alcohol and opium. And what was this Davis-donated “Joy to the World” (lower right), the “Pain Killer” that many missionaries were distributing? Why, it was a heavily alcoholic herbal elixir that was laced with opium…. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
When you reach for a “painkiller,” remember to thank New England manufacturers Perry Davis (1791 to 1862) and then his son Edmund (1824 to 1880) for the older Davis’s 1839 formulation of “Vegetable Pain-Killer.” By 1854 from Providence, Rhode Island, “Perry Davis & Son” (lower left) had become so prosperous that they were issuing one-cent paper notes (upper left) and one-cent revenue stamps (upper right). An ordained minister, Rev. Davis generously donated his “Pain Killer” to religious missions in China, India, and around the globe. From these religious outposts, dedicated missionaries promoted temperance and decried the evils of alcohol and opium. And what was this Davis-donated “Joy to the World” (lower right), the “Pain Killer” that many missionaries were distributing? Why, it was a heavily alcoholic herbal elixir that was laced with opium…. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.UJYC@aol.com.
When you reach for a “painkiller,” remember to thank New England manufacturers Perry Davis (1791 to 1862) and then his son Edmund (1824 to 1880) for the older Davis’s 1839 formulation of “Vegetable Pain-Killer.” By 1854 from Providence, Rhode Island, “Perry Davis & Son” (lower left) had become so prosperous that they were issuing one-cent paper notes (upper left) and one-cent revenue stamps (upper right). An ordained minister, Rev. Davis generously donated his “Pain Killer” to religious missions in China, India, and around the globe. From these religious outposts, dedicated missionaries promoted temperance and decried the evils of alcohol and opium. And what was this Davis-donated “Joy to the World” (lower right), the “Pain Killer” that many missionaries were distributing? Why, it was a heavily alcoholic herbal elixir that was laced with opium…. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
When you reach for a “painkiller,” remember to thank New England manufacturers Perry Davis (1791 to 1862) and then his son Edmund (1824 to 1880) for the older Davis’s 1839 formulation of “Vegetable Pain-Killer.” By 1854 from Providence, Rhode Island, “Perry Davis & Son” (lower left) had become so prosperous that they were issuing one-cent paper notes (upper left) and one-cent revenue stamps (upper right). An ordained minister, Rev. Davis generously donated his “Pain Killer” to religious missions in China, India, and around the globe. From these religious outposts, dedicated missionaries promoted temperance and decried the evils of alcohol and opium. And what was this Davis-donated “Joy to the World” (lower right), the “Pain Killer” that many missionaries were distributing? Why, it was a heavily alcoholic herbal elixir that was laced with opium…. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
When you reach for a “painkiller,” remember to thank New England manufacturers Perry Davis (1791 to 1862) and then his son Edmund (1824 to 1880) for the older Davis’s 1839 formulation of “Vegetable Pain-Killer.” By 1854 from Providence, Rhode Island, “Perry Davis & Son” (lower left) had become so prosperous that they were issuing one-cent paper notes (upper left) and one-cent revenue stamps (upper right). An ordained minister, Rev. Davis generously donated his “Pain Killer” to religious missions in China, India, and around the globe. From these religious outposts, dedicated missionaries promoted temperance and decried the evils of alcohol and opium. And what was this Davis-donated “Joy to the World” (lower right), the “Pain Killer” that many missionaries were distributing? Why, it was a heavily alcoholic herbal elixir that was laced with opium…. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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