Correspondence  |   May 2017
Front of Neck Airway: The Importance of the Correct (Obese) Models and (Trained) Participants in Study Design
Author Notes
  • Royal United Hospital, Bath, United Kingdom (F.E.K.). fiona. kelly@doctors.org.uk
  • (Accepted for publication January 26, 2017.)
    (Accepted for publication January 26, 2017.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   May 2017
Front of Neck Airway: The Importance of the Correct (Obese) Models and (Trained) Participants in Study Design
Anesthesiology 5 2017, Vol.126, 986-987. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001573
Anesthesiology 5 2017, Vol.126, 986-987. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001573
We read with great interest Professor Asai’s editorial on the management of “can’t intubate, can’t oxygenate” situations1  and Heymans et al.’s2  study of cricothyrotomy in cadavers. We agree with Professor Asai that this topic is extremely difficult to study and that it is difficult to recommend a definitive best technique for front of neck airway. The importance of the topic is exemplified by a recent statement and editorial by several anesthetic and surgical bodies in the United Kingdom supporting cricothyrotomy (not tracheostomy) as the first option in “can’t intubate, can’t oxygenate”3  and a response to this by the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (Melbourne, Australia).4 
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