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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   May 2017
Funding the Revival of Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia: “Publisher” G. Q. Colton Issues Edward Everett’s “Great Issues”
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   May 2017
Funding the Revival of Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia: “Publisher” G. Q. Colton Issues Edward Everett’s “Great Issues”
Anesthesiology 5 2017, Vol.126, 889. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001651
Anesthesiology 5 2017, Vol.126, 889. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001651
After losing the fortune he had gained in fraudulent land sales during California’s 1849 Gold Rush, Gardner Quincy Colton (1814 to 1898) cobbled together a living back in New York and New England as a newspaper reporter, an art exhibitor, and a publisher of war maps and miscellany such as “The Only Complete Edition” (right) of the Fourth of July speech delivered in 1861 by Edward Everett (1794 to 1865). Titled “The Great Issues now before the Country, an Oration,” (left), Everett’s oration was delivered less than three months after the outbreak of America’s Civil War. Arguably one of the nation’s most eloquent orators, Everett is now best (not?) remembered as the long-winded speaker whose two-hour lecture in 1863 preceded the more celebrated two-minute Gettysburg Address delivered by President Abraham Lincoln. Publishing Everett’s oration and other items helped Colton raise funds and eventually popularize the revival of nitrous oxide anesthesia for dental extractions. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
After losing the fortune he had gained in fraudulent land sales during California’s 1849 Gold Rush, Gardner Quincy Colton (1814 to 1898) cobbled together a living back in New York and New England as a newspaper reporter, an art exhibitor, and a publisher of war maps and miscellany such as “The Only Complete Edition” (right) of the Fourth of July speech delivered in 1861 by Edward Everett (1794 to 1865). Titled “The Great Issues now before the Country, an Oration,” (left), Everett’s oration was delivered less than three months after the outbreak of America’s Civil War. Arguably one of the nation’s most eloquent orators, Everett is now best (not?) remembered as the long-winded speaker whose two-hour lecture in 1863 preceded the more celebrated two-minute Gettysburg Address delivered by President Abraham Lincoln. Publishing Everett’s oration and other items helped Colton raise funds and eventually popularize the revival of nitrous oxide anesthesia for dental extractions. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
After losing the fortune he had gained in fraudulent land sales during California’s 1849 Gold Rush, Gardner Quincy Colton (1814 to 1898) cobbled together a living back in New York and New England as a newspaper reporter, an art exhibitor, and a publisher of war maps and miscellany such as “The Only Complete Edition” (right) of the Fourth of July speech delivered in 1861 by Edward Everett (1794 to 1865). Titled “The Great Issues now before the Country, an Oration,” (left), Everett’s oration was delivered less than three months after the outbreak of America’s Civil War. Arguably one of the nation’s most eloquent orators, Everett is now best (not?) remembered as the long-winded speaker whose two-hour lecture in 1863 preceded the more celebrated two-minute Gettysburg Address delivered by President Abraham Lincoln. Publishing Everett’s oration and other items helped Colton raise funds and eventually popularize the revival of nitrous oxide anesthesia for dental extractions. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
After losing the fortune he had gained in fraudulent land sales during California’s 1849 Gold Rush, Gardner Quincy Colton (1814 to 1898) cobbled together a living back in New York and New England as a newspaper reporter, an art exhibitor, and a publisher of war maps and miscellany such as “The Only Complete Edition” (right) of the Fourth of July speech delivered in 1861 by Edward Everett (1794 to 1865). Titled “The Great Issues now before the Country, an Oration,” (left), Everett’s oration was delivered less than three months after the outbreak of America’s Civil War. Arguably one of the nation’s most eloquent orators, Everett is now best (not?) remembered as the long-winded speaker whose two-hour lecture in 1863 preceded the more celebrated two-minute Gettysburg Address delivered by President Abraham Lincoln. Publishing Everett’s oration and other items helped Colton raise funds and eventually popularize the revival of nitrous oxide anesthesia for dental extractions. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
After losing the fortune he had gained in fraudulent land sales during California’s 1849 Gold Rush, Gardner Quincy Colton (1814 to 1898) cobbled together a living back in New York and New England as a newspaper reporter, an art exhibitor, and a publisher of war maps and miscellany such as “The Only Complete Edition” (right) of the Fourth of July speech delivered in 1861 by Edward Everett (1794 to 1865). Titled “The Great Issues now before the Country, an Oration,” (left), Everett’s oration was delivered less than three months after the outbreak of America’s Civil War. Arguably one of the nation’s most eloquent orators, Everett is now best (not?) remembered as the long-winded speaker whose two-hour lecture in 1863 preceded the more celebrated two-minute Gettysburg Address delivered by President Abraham Lincoln. Publishing Everett’s oration and other items helped Colton raise funds and eventually popularize the revival of nitrous oxide anesthesia for dental extractions. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
After losing the fortune he had gained in fraudulent land sales during California’s 1849 Gold Rush, Gardner Quincy Colton (1814 to 1898) cobbled together a living back in New York and New England as a newspaper reporter, an art exhibitor, and a publisher of war maps and miscellany such as “The Only Complete Edition” (right) of the Fourth of July speech delivered in 1861 by Edward Everett (1794 to 1865). Titled “The Great Issues now before the Country, an Oration,” (left), Everett’s oration was delivered less than three months after the outbreak of America’s Civil War. Arguably one of the nation’s most eloquent orators, Everett is now best (not?) remembered as the long-winded speaker whose two-hour lecture in 1863 preceded the more celebrated two-minute Gettysburg Address delivered by President Abraham Lincoln. Publishing Everett’s oration and other items helped Colton raise funds and eventually popularize the revival of nitrous oxide anesthesia for dental extractions. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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