Editorial Views  |   June 2017
In Memoriam: Jean Mantz, 1960 to 2017
Author Notes
  • Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Pierre et Marie Curie University, Paris, France.
  • Accepted for publication March 10, 2017.
    Accepted for publication March 10, 2017.×
  • Past Editor of Anesthesiology.
    Past Editor of Anesthesiology.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Riou: bruno.riou@psl.aphp.fr.
Article Information
Editorial Views / Critical Care / Ethics / Medicolegal Issues / Ophthalmologic Anesthesia / Pediatric Anesthesia
Editorial Views   |   June 2017
In Memoriam: Jean Mantz, 1960 to 2017
Anesthesiology 6 2017, Vol.126, 991-992. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001641
Anesthesiology 6 2017, Vol.126, 991-992. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001641
JEAN MANTZ, Editor of Anesthesiology, passed away on January 9, 2017, a few days after he was admitted into hospital for the final time. He fought a battle against illness for more than 5 yr with dignity and continued working until his very last days. He faced his impending death as a man of great courage and set an example I would dearly like to follow when my turn comes.
Jean Mantz studied medicine at the Medical School of the University of Strasbourg (France), following in his father’s footsteps, who was the Dean of the Faculty. He moved to the Denis Diderot Faculty of Medicine in Paris, where he graduated. During his residency, he chose to become an anesthesiologist and critical care specialist. Very early on, however, he was attracted by fundamental research and admitted into one of the most prestigious research bodies in France, the College de France (where Claude Bernard had worked during the nineteenth century), to conduct research on the neurologic mechanisms of anesthetic agents under the supervision of Pr. Jacques Glowinski. Jean Mantz was appointed as Assistant Professor in 1991 at the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the Bichat Hospital in Paris (under Pr. Jean-Marie Desmonts), which was one of the most renowned departments of anesthesiology in France. Only 5 yr later he became Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care as a result of international recognition for his scientific work, both in experimental and clinical research. In this era when French anesthesiology had just begun to establish its firm modern scientific basis, it should be noted that he was the first French anesthesiologist who succeeded in publishing experimental research in a leading international journal.
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