Special Articles  |   June 2017
Lost in Translation: The 2016 John W. Severinghaus Lecture on Translational Research
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Outcomes Research, Anesthesiology Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
  • This article is featured in “This Month in Anesthesiology,” page 1A.
    This article is featured in “This Month in Anesthesiology,” page 1A.×
  • This article is based on the John W. Severinghaus Lecture delivered by the author at the October 25, 2016, American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting in Chicago.
    This article is based on the John W. Severinghaus Lecture delivered by the author at the October 25, 2016, American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting in Chicago.×
  • A video version of Dr. Sessler’s October 25, 2016, Severinghaus lecture is available at https://vimeo.com/190762203/b37fa762d4.
    A video version of Dr. Sessler’s October 25, 2016, Severinghaus lecture is available at https://vimeo.com/190762203/b37fa762d4.×
  • Submitted for publication October 11, 2016. Accepted for publication December 7, 2016.
    Submitted for publication October 11, 2016. Accepted for publication December 7, 2016.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Sessler: Department of Outcomes Research, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue/P77, Cleveland, Ohio 44195. DS@OR.org. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Special Articles / Cardiovascular Anesthesia
Special Articles   |   June 2017
Lost in Translation: The 2016 John W. Severinghaus Lecture on Translational Research
Anesthesiology 6 2017, Vol.126, 995-1004. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001603
Anesthesiology 6 2017, Vol.126, 995-1004. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001603
IN 1954, the year I was born, Dylan Thomas wrote, “Time held me green and dying, but I sang in my chains like the sea.” In these lines, he expresses his disdain for aging, illness, infirmity, and eventual death. How differently the great poet must have felt 2 yr before his premature death when he penned his most famous lines:
Consider a young mother with cancer. Consider a child with a lethal congenital condition. Rage seems the only appropriate response to the dying of the light. But of course, none of us wants to go into that good night any earlier than strictly necessary, and preferably only after long and fulfilling lives. Neither do our patients. After all, the one thing patients ask of us, above all else, is to keep them alive. It is thus reasonable to ask how well we do. The answer depends on which perioperative period we consider.
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