Editorial Views  |   May 2017
Searching for the Optimal Pain Management Technique after Knee Arthroplasty: Analgesia Is Just the Tip of the Iceberg
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, and Outcomes Research Consortium, Cleveland, Ohio (B.M.I.); and the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (C.J.L.M.).
  • Corresponding article on page 923.
    Corresponding article on page 923.×
  • Accepted for publication February 2, 2017.
    Accepted for publication February 2, 2017.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Ilfeld: bilfeld@ucsd.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Pain Medicine
Editorial Views   |   May 2017
Searching for the Optimal Pain Management Technique after Knee Arthroplasty: Analgesia Is Just the Tip of the Iceberg
Anesthesiology 5 2017, Vol.126, 768-770. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001608
Anesthesiology 5 2017, Vol.126, 768-770. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001608
TOTAL knee arthroplasty (TKA) is among the most common and painful surgical procedures, with more than 700,000 performed annually within the United States alone. Due to the difficulty of providing adequate pain relief, practitioners have proposed and evaluated a plethora of analgesic techniques. Unfortunately, little consensus exists as to the optimal method, in no small part because most investigations have only compared two or three methods—or combinations of methods—at a time. It is therefore noteworthy that a study published in this issue of Anesthesiology by Terkawi et al.1  uses an innovative technique—network meta-analysis—to simultaneously compare 17 different analgesic modalities after TKA and provide new insight into this important issue.
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