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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   March 2017
From Water to Ether: Oconee Hill Cemetery
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   March 2017
From Water to Ether: Oconee Hill Cemetery
Anesthesiology 3 2017, Vol.126, 560. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001556
Anesthesiology 3 2017, Vol.126, 560. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001556
In Athens in northeastern Georgia, Oconee Hill Cemetery stretches near East Campus Road, opposite Sanford Stadium, the home of the University of Georgia’s Bulldogs. The cemetery’s hill was named after part of the Oconee River, itself named after the Oconee tribe of Native Americans. Claiming southeastern Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp as their original homeland, the Oconees had their current name anglicized from the Itsati or Hitchiti-Creek word Okvni for “born from water.” Many anesthesiologists treasure Oconee Hill Cemetery as the burial site for physician-pharmacist Crawford Williamson Long, M.D. (1815 to 1878), who etherized James Venable on March 30, 1842. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In Athens in northeastern Georgia, Oconee Hill Cemetery stretches near East Campus Road, opposite Sanford Stadium, the home of the University of Georgia’s Bulldogs. The cemetery’s hill was named after part of the Oconee River, itself named after the Oconee tribe of Native Americans. Claiming southeastern Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp as their original homeland, the Oconees had their current name anglicized from the Itsati or Hitchiti-Creek word Okvni for “born from water.” Many anesthesiologists treasure Oconee Hill Cemetery as the burial site for physician-pharmacist Crawford Williamson Long, M.D. (1815 to 1878), who etherized James Venable on March 30, 1842. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In Athens in northeastern Georgia, Oconee Hill Cemetery stretches near East Campus Road, opposite Sanford Stadium, the home of the University of Georgia’s Bulldogs. The cemetery’s hill was named after part of the Oconee River, itself named after the Oconee tribe of Native Americans. Claiming southeastern Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp as their original homeland, the Oconees had their current name anglicized from the Itsati or Hitchiti-Creek word Okvni for “born from water.” Many anesthesiologists treasure Oconee Hill Cemetery as the burial site for physician-pharmacist Crawford Williamson Long, M.D. (1815 to 1878), who etherized James Venable on March 30, 1842. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois; and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
In Athens in northeastern Georgia, Oconee Hill Cemetery stretches near East Campus Road, opposite Sanford Stadium, the home of the University of Georgia’s Bulldogs. The cemetery’s hill was named after part of the Oconee River, itself named after the Oconee tribe of Native Americans. Claiming southeastern Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp as their original homeland, the Oconees had their current name anglicized from the Itsati or Hitchiti-Creek word Okvni for “born from water.” Many anesthesiologists treasure Oconee Hill Cemetery as the burial site for physician-pharmacist Crawford Williamson Long, M.D. (1815 to 1878), who etherized James Venable on March 30, 1842. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In Athens in northeastern Georgia, Oconee Hill Cemetery stretches near East Campus Road, opposite Sanford Stadium, the home of the University of Georgia’s Bulldogs. The cemetery’s hill was named after part of the Oconee River, itself named after the Oconee tribe of Native Americans. Claiming southeastern Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp as their original homeland, the Oconees had their current name anglicized from the Itsati or Hitchiti-Creek word Okvni for “born from water.” Many anesthesiologists treasure Oconee Hill Cemetery as the burial site for physician-pharmacist Crawford Williamson Long, M.D. (1815 to 1878), who etherized James Venable on March 30, 1842. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In Athens in northeastern Georgia, Oconee Hill Cemetery stretches near East Campus Road, opposite Sanford Stadium, the home of the University of Georgia’s Bulldogs. The cemetery’s hill was named after part of the Oconee River, itself named after the Oconee tribe of Native Americans. Claiming southeastern Georgia’s Okefenokee Swamp as their original homeland, the Oconees had their current name anglicized from the Itsati or Hitchiti-Creek word Okvni for “born from water.” Many anesthesiologists treasure Oconee Hill Cemetery as the burial site for physician-pharmacist Crawford Williamson Long, M.D. (1815 to 1878), who etherized James Venable on March 30, 1842. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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