Correspondence  |   February 2017
As the Pendulum Swings from the Needle to the Scalpel, the Evolution of Emergency Airway Management Will Continue
Author Notes
  • University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. hgrocott@sbgh.mb.ca
  • (Accepted for publication October 26, 2016.)
    (Accepted for publication October 26, 2016.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   February 2017
As the Pendulum Swings from the Needle to the Scalpel, the Evolution of Emergency Airway Management Will Continue
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 355-356. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001448
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 355-356. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001448
The recent editorial by Asai1  addressing the challenges of cricothyrotomy for the management of “cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate” situations appropriately identifies the need for additional research as to how to optimally manage this airway emergency. Although the study by Heymans et al.2  to which it refers addresses the advantages of an open scalpel–driven cricothyrotomy over a percutaneous approach, a fundamental aspect of cricothyrotomy, irrespective of the technique chosen, is the actual identification of the cricothyroid membrane itself.3  Recently, this was highlighted by a study that showed that neither anesthesiologists nor surgeons themselves are particularly good at finding this important airway landmark.4  So, whichever technique is chosen, it is important that adequate training in identification of the cricothyroid membrane has been first mastered.
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