Correspondence  |   February 2017
Cutaneous Mitochondrial Po2: A Beginning of a New Era?
Author Notes
  • Cook County Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (M.M.). mmikhael@cookcountyhhs.org
  • (Accepted for publication October 5, 2016.)
    (Accepted for publication October 5, 2016.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   February 2017
Cutaneous Mitochondrial Po2: A Beginning of a New Era?
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 348. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001437
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 348. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001437
We read with great interest the article about cutaneous mitochondrial Po2 (mito-Po2) by Römers et al. in the July 2016 issue of Anesthesiology. We congratulate them for their hard work in producing this demanding and important proof-of-concept study; it may prove to be revolutionary in transfusion medicine if a safe and feasible monitor of mito-Po2 becomes commercially available.
However, we would like to make the following points. First, the authors administered intravenous anesthetics (ketamine, midazolam, sufentanil, and rocuronium) only and did not use inhalation agents at all.1  In humans, inhalation anesthetics are used much more frequently. Inhalation agents and ketamine may suppress metabolism differently. Consequently, this can affect the cutaneous mito-Po2 measurements if inhalation agents suppress metabolism and oxygen consumption greater than ketamine. In addition, inhalation anesthetics produce peripheral vasodilation, which may not be the case with ketamine. The result may lead to a different blood flow pattern and hence different oxygen supply.2  One of the reasons the authors may have chosen intravenous agents is to avoid the vasodilatory and hypotensive effect that accompanies the usage of inhalation agents.
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