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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   February 2017
Jetting after Dr. Douglas Sanders: From “Valley Forge” to New Haven to the Wood Library-Museum
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   February 2017
Jetting after Dr. Douglas Sanders: From “Valley Forge” to New Haven to the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 337. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001502
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 337. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001502
During World War II, a medical inventor and artist named R. Douglas Sanders, M.D. (1906 to 1977), served as Anesthetist-in-Chief at Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Less than 8 miles from where that facility once operated, I graduated from Ursinus College, Collegeville, Pennsylvania—the year that Dr. Sanders passed away. Fifteen years later in New Haven, Connecticut, as an assistant professor at Yale, I became a second-generation trainee on the Sanders jet injector, learning from a Sanders-trained nurse anesthetist named Michael Johnston. Later, as an honorary curator, I facilitated the acquisition of a watercolor (above), Sanders’ Late Blooming, for the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. From “Valley Forge” to New Haven to the Wood Library-Museum, I seem to have spent my life chasing after this accomplished anesthesiologist, artist, and inventor, Dr. R. Douglas Sanders. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
During World War II, a medical inventor and artist named R. Douglas Sanders, M.D. (1906 to 1977), served as Anesthetist-in-Chief at Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Less than 8 miles from where that facility once operated, I graduated from Ursinus College, Collegeville, Pennsylvania—the year that Dr. Sanders passed away. Fifteen years later in New Haven, Connecticut, as an assistant professor at Yale, I became a second-generation trainee on the Sanders jet injector, learning from a Sanders-trained nurse anesthetist named Michael Johnston. Later, as an honorary curator, I facilitated the acquisition of a watercolor (above), Sanders’ Late Blooming, for the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. From “Valley Forge” to New Haven to the Wood Library-Museum, I seem to have spent my life chasing after this accomplished anesthesiologist, artist, and inventor, Dr. R. Douglas Sanders. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
During World War II, a medical inventor and artist named R. Douglas Sanders, M.D. (1906 to 1977), served as Anesthetist-in-Chief at Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Less than 8 miles from where that facility once operated, I graduated from Ursinus College, Collegeville, Pennsylvania—the year that Dr. Sanders passed away. Fifteen years later in New Haven, Connecticut, as an assistant professor at Yale, I became a second-generation trainee on the Sanders jet injector, learning from a Sanders-trained nurse anesthetist named Michael Johnston. Later, as an honorary curator, I facilitated the acquisition of a watercolor (above), Sanders’ Late Blooming, for the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. From “Valley Forge” to New Haven to the Wood Library-Museum, I seem to have spent my life chasing after this accomplished anesthesiologist, artist, and inventor, Dr. R. Douglas Sanders. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
During World War II, a medical inventor and artist named R. Douglas Sanders, M.D. (1906 to 1977), served as Anesthetist-in-Chief at Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Less than 8 miles from where that facility once operated, I graduated from Ursinus College, Collegeville, Pennsylvania—the year that Dr. Sanders passed away. Fifteen years later in New Haven, Connecticut, as an assistant professor at Yale, I became a second-generation trainee on the Sanders jet injector, learning from a Sanders-trained nurse anesthetist named Michael Johnston. Later, as an honorary curator, I facilitated the acquisition of a watercolor (above), Sanders’ Late Blooming, for the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. From “Valley Forge” to New Haven to the Wood Library-Museum, I seem to have spent my life chasing after this accomplished anesthesiologist, artist, and inventor, Dr. R. Douglas Sanders. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
During World War II, a medical inventor and artist named R. Douglas Sanders, M.D. (1906 to 1977), served as Anesthetist-in-Chief at Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Less than 8 miles from where that facility once operated, I graduated from Ursinus College, Collegeville, Pennsylvania—the year that Dr. Sanders passed away. Fifteen years later in New Haven, Connecticut, as an assistant professor at Yale, I became a second-generation trainee on the Sanders jet injector, learning from a Sanders-trained nurse anesthetist named Michael Johnston. Later, as an honorary curator, I facilitated the acquisition of a watercolor (above), Sanders’ Late Blooming, for the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. From “Valley Forge” to New Haven to the Wood Library-Museum, I seem to have spent my life chasing after this accomplished anesthesiologist, artist, and inventor, Dr. R. Douglas Sanders. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
During World War II, a medical inventor and artist named R. Douglas Sanders, M.D. (1906 to 1977), served as Anesthetist-in-Chief at Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Less than 8 miles from where that facility once operated, I graduated from Ursinus College, Collegeville, Pennsylvania—the year that Dr. Sanders passed away. Fifteen years later in New Haven, Connecticut, as an assistant professor at Yale, I became a second-generation trainee on the Sanders jet injector, learning from a Sanders-trained nurse anesthetist named Michael Johnston. Later, as an honorary curator, I facilitated the acquisition of a watercolor (above), Sanders’ Late Blooming, for the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. From “Valley Forge” to New Haven to the Wood Library-Museum, I seem to have spent my life chasing after this accomplished anesthesiologist, artist, and inventor, Dr. R. Douglas Sanders. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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