Editorial Views  |   March 2017
Adjusting the Focus on Transfusion-associated Circulatory Overload
Author Notes
  • From the Blood Systems Research Institute, San Francisco, California (N.R., E.L.M.); Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, Oakland, California (N.R.); and Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (E.L.M.).
  • Corresponding article on page 409.
    Corresponding article on page 409.×
  • Accepted for publication October 28, 2016.
    Accepted for publication October 28, 2016.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Murphy: murphy@ucsf.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views
Editorial Views   |   March 2017
Adjusting the Focus on Transfusion-associated Circulatory Overload
Anesthesiology 3 2017, Vol.126, 363-365. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001507
Anesthesiology 3 2017, Vol.126, 363-365. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001507
TRANSFUSION-ASSOCIATED circulatory overload (TACO) remains the most common pulmonary complication of transfusion and the second most common cause of transfusion-related deaths reported to the Food and Drug Administration.1  The term TACO was coined by Popovsky2  in 1983 and is characterized by new or worsening hydrostatic pulmonary edema occurring within 6 h of blood transfusion. Its incidence, especially in perioperative settings where approximately one quarter of blood components is transfused, has historically been underestimated due to passive reporting. However, with the advent of electronic health records, we have seen advances in algorithms to screen and identify cases of posttransfusion pulmonary edema. Toy et al.3,4  pioneered such algorithms in their study of transfusion-related acute lung injury at the University of California San Francisco (San Francisco, California), and the Mayo Clinic group has used them to study the epidemiology of pulmonary transfusion reactions. In this issue, Clifford et al.5  characterize risk factors and associated outcomes related to perioperative TACO.
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